Q&As

Want to search for the relevant question and answer in your own language? Change the language in the dropdown menu above.

REACH

Authorisation

Applications for Authorisation - a) Scope and procedure

Does the exemption from the authorisation requirement for substances in mixtures (Article 56(6)b of REACH) depend on their classification in any hazard class or only the hazard classes for which the substance was included in the authorisation list?

The authorisation requirement does not apply to the use of CMR substances when they are present in mixtures below the concentration limits specified in Article 11(3) of the CLP Regulation, which result in the classification of the mixture as hazardous (Article 56(6)b of REACH).

Only the hazard class (or hazard classes) which specifically led to inclusion of the substance in the authorisation list should be taken into account.

The basis for this is to target the intrinsic properties of highest concern, which is the objective of the authorisation process.

This is reflected in the legal provisions of REACH:

  • Article 62(4), which requires an application for authorisation only for the hazard class given in the authorisation list, and
  • Article 60(2), which limits the assessment of a request for authorisation to the hazard class given in the authorisation list under the adequate control route.

 

Is there any tonnage threshold below which Annex XIV substances are exempted from the authorisation requirement?

No. There is no tonnage threshold below which (the placing on the market for) a use of an Annex XIV substance is exempted from the authorisation requirement.

Does the authorisation requirement apply to the use of substances in articles?
No. The placing on the market or the use of an article which contains an Annex XIV substance is not subject to the authorisation requirement. However, if not specifically exempted otherwise, the incorporation of an Annex XIV substance into an article is a use which is subject to the authorisation requirement. Moreover, the Chemical Safety Report of an application for authorisation for a given substance should cover the whole substance service-life for the "use(s) applied for", including the service life of articles and the waste stage (see Article 62(4)(d) and Annex I (5.1.2) and (5.2.2) of REACH).
 
Other legal requirements also apply to substances of the Candidate List present in articles, such as communication obligations along the supply chain and notification to ECHA:
 
Article 33(1) of REACH requires that a supplier of articles containing a SVHC included in the Candidate List for authorisation in a concentration above 0.1% (w/w) has to provide relevant safety information to the recipients of these articles. Upon request of a consumer, the same supplier has to provide relevant safety information about the SVHC available to him also to this consumer (Article 33(2) of REACH). This obligation applies irrespective of the tonnage of the substance used and also applies to imported articles. Importers and producers of articles have to, under certain conditions, notify to ECHA if their articles contain Candidate List substances (as per Article 7 of REACH).
For more information, see: 
 
Does the authorisation requirement apply to a substance in Annex XIV that is present as an impurity in another substance or mixture?

The authorisation requirement applies to the placing on the market and use of a substance on its own as listed in Annex XIV. Therefore, it usually does not apply if the Annex XIV substance is only an impurity or additive or constituent of another substance, unless this is specified in the Annex XIV entry (e.g. substance W and substances X, Y and Z containing substance W in a concentration ≥ x %) or the other substance is also listed in Annex XIV.If a substance listed in Annex XIV is included as a component in a mixture, the authorisation requirement applies for this use (i.e. the formulation of the mixture). Further, the placing on the market and use of such mixtures require authorisation, unless the Annex XIV substance is present in the mixture below the concentration limits set out in REACH Article 56(6).
See also: Guidance for identification and naming of substances under REACH (link to http://echa.europa.eu/documents/10162/13643/substance_id_en.pdf)

Are uses of recovered substances exempted from the authorisation requirement?

No. Uses of recovered substances are not exempted from the authorisation requirement. As in case of use(s) of any other Annex XIV substance, use(s) of a recovered substance whose identifiers correspond to those of an entry in the Annex XIV of REACH is subject to the authorisation requirement, unless the use of the substance is specifically exempted otherwise.
See also: Guidance on waste and recovered substances http://echa.europa.eu/documents/10162/13632/waste_recovered_en.pdf

Who can apply for an authorisation?

Only manufacturers, importers or downstream users of an Annex XIV substance as well as duly mandated Only Representatives can apply for an authorisation and be holders of a granted authorisation.

Can an Only Representative apply for an authorisation?

Yes. A duly mandated Only Representative ("OR") of a non-EU manufacturer can apply for an authorisation regardless of whether the OR assisted the non-EU entity with the registration of the Annex XIV substance to date. Once the OR has been appointed, it will have to comply with all other applicable obligations under REACH on behalf of the non-EU manufacturer who has appointed them. In cases where a non-EU manufacturer has not yet been appointed an OR, for example due to no obligation to register a substance, an OR may nevertheless be appointed. The OR will then represent the non-EU manufacturer with regard to all applicable REACH obligations.

Will only the person who submitted the authorisation application to ECHA benefit from the granted authorisation?

The holder of an authorisation is the person who submitted the authorisation application to ECHA. However, a downstream user may continue his use of an Annex XIV substance provided that this use is in accordance with the conditions of an authorisation granted to an actor up his supply chain for that use. Moreover, a manufacturer, importer or downstream user can continue placing an Annex XIV substance on the market for a use for which his immediate downstream user was granted an authorisation.

See supply chain coverage diagram

Who will decide on the granting and conditions of an authorisation?

The European Commission is responsible for taking decisions on Applications for authorisations. ECHA's Committees for Risk Assessment (RAC) and Socio-Economic Analysis (SEAC) will adopt opinions on the application for authorisation which will be taken into account by the Commission in its final decision.

Will my application be processed if I submit it outside the submission windows?

Yes. Be aware, however, that ECHA recommends applicants to submit their applications within submission windows that are published on its website. This concept ensures a batch wise process and a good synchronisation with the operational schedule of RAC and SEAC committees.

Why should I submit the application before the Latest Application Date?

You should apply before the Latest Application Date to be sure that you will be able to continue to use the substance while your application is being treated by ECHA and the Commission. In other words, you should apply early to take advantage of the transitional arrangements and continue your use after the sunset date even if no decision has been taken by the Commission.

The date of submission of the application will be considered as the date on which your application has been received for the purpose of benefitting from the transitional arrangements described in Article 58(1)(c)(ii), provided that you pass the business rules checks. This date is relevant if you intend to take advantage of these transitional arrangements and continue your use after the sunset date if no decision has been taken by the Commission. The following two situations may occur:

1. You have submitted your application early enough and it passes business rules checks before the latest application date: in this case you will benefit from the transitional arrangements described in Article 58(1)(c)(ii) provided that you pay your invoice in due time.

2. You have submitted your application just before the latest application date but it passes the business rules after the latest application date: in this case you can benefit from the transitional arrangements described in Article 58(1)(c)(ii) provided that you pay your invoice in due time. If your application does not pass the business rules checks you will have to resubmit your application. If you resubmit your application after the latest application date you will not be able to benefit from the transitional arrangements.

Therefore ECHA recommends that you submit your application during the submission window three months earlier than the latest application date. If you choose to submit in the latest submission window, ECHA recommends that you do so at the very beginning of the window.

The date from which the 10 months' time limit for the Committees to prepare their draft opinions starts is the date on which ECHA has received the application fee.

Will my application be processed if I submit it after the Latest Application Date?

Yes, the application will still be accepted for processing and evaluated by RAC and SEAC. However, the transitional arrangements under Article 58 (1)(c)(ii) of the REACH Regulation will not apply. These transitional arrangements would allow the applicant to use the substance even after the Sunset Date if no decision has been taken by the Commission.

Are end points related to the intrinsic properties of Annex XIV more critical than other end points?

If the substance has a threshold you need to demonstrate that the risks associated for the hazard endpoint mentioned in Annex XIV are adequately controlled. If the substance does not have a threshold, you need to demonstrate minimisation of emissions and exposure as far as possible. The Chemical Safety Report (CSR) should therefore focus on the Annex XIV endpoint but information on other endpoints might be necessary for comparing the risks with the alternatives. The alternatives should result in reduced overall risks to human health and the environment. Therefore, it is important not only to consider the risks arising from the Annex XIV endpoint but also on all other possible risks from the Annex XIV substance and the alternatives.

Can the decision taken by the Commission be different for the several uses included in my application?

A decision on authorising a use can be different from one use to another. Thus, if certain uses are authorised and others are not, then the non-authorised uses are no longer permitted.

How RAC and SEAC work together? Can they disagree with each other?

The primary objective of RAC and SEAC is to provide consistent opinions of high scientific quality to support the desicion making of the European Commission. The remits of both Committees are clear and cooperation between them is ensured by agreed procedures.
See also: http://echa.europa.eu/documents/10162/13555/common_approach_rac_seac_en.pdf

Can a distributor be considered as the immediate Downstream User (DU) in the context of article 56(1) (e) and apply for an authorisation?

No. A distributor who only stores the Annex XIV substance before placing it on the market cannot be considered as Downstream Users in the context of Article 56(1)(e) (see Article 3(14) of the REACH Regulation). However, actors can no longer be considered as distributors if they use the substances themselves (e.g. repackaging). Then they are considered as downstream users and, as such, shall apply for authorisation (and may cover uses of their downstream users), unless already covered by an authorisation.

Distributors (i.e. entities who only store the substance) are "transparent" in the supply chain if they do not "use" the substance. Therefore an application granted to a downstream user should be understood as covering the manufacturer/importer of that substance and all the distributors in between. However, this only applies in cases where there are no actors using the substance (e.g. formulators, repackaging companies, etc.) between the downstream user applicant and the manufacturer/importer. Also, distributors have to communicate the relevant information (e.g. safety data sheets, authorisation numbers) to their downstream users.

Can a Downstream User apply for uses upstream in the supply chain?

No. A downstream user (Company B) holding an authorisation for his use(s) (for instance, an end-use) can be supplied by an actor (Company A) up his supply chain (for instance, a formulator) in accordance with Article 56(1)(e). However, the use of Company A (that is the formulation of the Annex XIV substance) cannot be covered by an authorisation granted down the supply chain to Company B. Company A needs to have his use (the formulation) covered by a separate authorisation granted directly to him or to an actor up his supply chain (for instance the manufacturer of the Annex XIV substance). Note that distributors who only store the Annex XIV substance before placing it on the market cannot be considered as Downstream Users in the context of Article 56(1)(e), see Q&A 577 for more details.

See supply chain coverage diagram

I use an Annex XIV substance in a mixture. Should the information in the application be presented for the mixture or for the substance?

Information presented should be for the substance as the authorisation is (or is not) granted for a given substance.
See also FAQ ID=130 in Frequently Asked Questions about REACH.

May an authorisation be reviewed before the expiry of the period for which it has been granted for?

Yes. An authorisation can be reviewed before the expiry of the review period. REACH Art 61(2) specifies that: "Authorisations may be reviewed at any time if: (a) the circumstances of the original authorisation have changed so as to affect the risk to human health or the environment, or the socio- economic impact; or (b) new information on possible substitutes becomes available"". In this case, the Commission shall set a reasonable deadline by which the holder(s) of the authorisation may submit further information necessary for the review and indicate by when it (i.e. the Commission) will take a final decision.

What rights does the applicant have to challenge the decision of the Commission?

An applicant has the right to contest the decision of the Commission before the General Court.

Who will enforce the authorisation decisions and how?

The enforcement of REACH is a responsibility of each EU Member State, as well as the members of the EEA (Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein). They must ensure that there is an official system of controls and lay down legislation specifying penalties for non-compliance with the provisions of REACH. See also FAQ ID=3 in Frequently Asked Questions about REACH.

What other key sources of information might ECHA use when evaluating Applications for authorisation?

All information available to ECHA could be used; for instance, CLP notifications, dossier evaluation results or any relevant information arising from the public consultation on alternatives.

When will I receive the decision of the Commission after I have submitted my application?

It will take about 2 years. Article 64 of the REACH Regulation gives many details. Below we give an overall description of the timelines. Once you have submitted the application it takes about 2-3 months for its processing and for the application fee to be received by ECHA. The Committees will prepare their draft opinions within 10 months from that date of receipt of the fee. The applicant can comment on the draft opinions within 2 months before the Committees adopt their final opinions. This will take 2 months. Some weeks are also reserved for sending and receiving the draft opinion. Thus, it takes about 17-18 months for the applicant to receive the final opinions from the date it had submitted the application. ECHA will publish the opinions on its website and send them to the Commission, the Member States and the applicant. A final decision granting or refusing the authorisation shall be taken via a 'comitology' procedure (see the "examination procedure" referred to in Article 5 of Regulation (EU) No 182/2011). All in all, it would normally take about 6 months to have the final decision from the publication of the opinions of the Scientific Committees on ECHA's website.

Does the exemption for the use of Annex XIV substances in scientific research and development under Article 56(3) REACH also apply to analytical activities such as monitoring and quality control?

Yes, it does. Under Article 3(23) of REACH, scientific research and development means any scientific experimentation, analysis or chemical research carried out under controlled conditions in a volume less than one tonne per year. Thus, the use of an Annex XIV substance in analysis is exempted from authorisation under Article 56(3) if the substance is used, on its own or in a mixture, in analytical activities such as monitoring and quality control where these activities are carried out under controlled conditions and in a volume not exceeding one tonne per year and per legal entity. The exemption applies to the use of an Annex XIV substance when it is required as part of an analytical method for the measurement of another substance or property (e.g. used as an extraction solvent or reagent) and the analysis of the Annex XIV substance itself (e.g. for quality or process control). Where these conditions are met, there is no need to apply for an authorisation for this use or to include this task as a working contributing scenario (i.e. PROC 15) in an application for authorisation. This exemption applies irrespective of where the analysis is performed i.e. on-site or off-site facilities. However, this exemption does not cover sampling activities (see Q&A  1153).

Are there clear criteria on which the opinions will be based and which could provide more certainty about the outcome of the application?

The criteria for granting an authorisation are clearly defined in Art. 60 of REACH: under the "adequate control route" (Art. 60(2)) an application shall be granted if the risk to human health and the environment from the use of the substance arising from the intrinsic properties specified in Annex XIV is adequately controlled.

 Under the "socio-economic route" (Art. 60(4)), an authorisation may be granted if it is shown that (i) the socio-economic benefits outweigh the risk to human health and the environment from the use of the substance and (ii) there is no suitable alternative substances or technologies.

The factors to be taken into account for assessing the availability of suitable alternatives are described in Art. 60(5) and in the Guidance on Applications for Authorisation.

Also, two important documents describe how RAC and SEAC intend to evaluate the applications:

As a downstream user relying on an authorisation granted to a manufacturer/importer up in my supply chain, will I receive a unique authorisation number for all the authorised uses?

No. An authorisation number is unique to each combination of [applicant-substance-use applied for]. If the downstream user is himself an applicant (in either single or joint application), he will get its own authorisation number(s) related to the authorised use(s). If the downstream user is not an applicant but that he relies on an authorisation granted to a manufacturer/importer up his supply chain for his uses, the downstream user will not receive his own authorisation number(s) but he will be informed by his supplier about the authorisation number (which should be mentioned at least on the label of the product). 

Can restrictions be applied on the use of Annex XIV substances in articles?

Yes. After the sunset date, according to Article 69(2), ECHA has the obligation to consider the risks related to the corresponding Annex XIV substance in articles and possibly apply the restriction procedure if the risk to human health or the environment is not adequately controlled. In this case, the Agency shall prepare a dossier which conforms to the requirements of Annex XV. This assessment will have to be done for each Annex XIV substance after its corresponding sunset date.

In addition, Member States or ECHA (on request from the Commission) may propose a restriction at any time on the use of any substance (including SVHCs) in articles if the risks arising from the use of these articles are not properly controlled.
 

Can an Only Representative apply for an authorisation on behalf of several companies located outside the EU?

Yes. The non-EU companies can also be located in different jurisdictions. The application fee will be assessed for each non-EU legal entity the Only Representative represents in the application.

Only Representatives have to sign-up in REACH-IT for each non-EU company they represent and submit the relevant IUCLID dossier using the appropriate accounts. It is not possible to use the same Legal Entity Object (having the same company UUID) for multiple accounts, but it is possible to use the same company identification information (name, VAT, etc.). Similarly as for Registration, Only Representatives must indicate in the "company size" field of REACH-IT the size of the non-EU company they are representing. In the determination of their size, linked and partner enterprises to the company the Only Representative represents should also be taken into account.

In addition, Only Representatives are advised to attach clear documentation of their appointment in their application (for instance, a copy of the appointment) in the field "Assignment from non EU manufacturer" of the IUCLID file (IUCLID section 1.7). Only Representatives are also advised to indicate the list of the importers' names covered by the application in the field "Other importers".

For more details:

 
Will ECHA inform the applicant if it has accepted the justifications for claiming certain information confidential?

No. ECHA will not inform the applicant of its decision on all the confidentiality claims in the application for authorisation.

On the other hand, there may be situations where ECHA finds it necessary to make publicly available information that the applicant claimed confidential. In such cases ECHA will inform the applicant of this decision and allow him to respond appropriately.

An example of such a situation is if insufficient information falling under the broad information of uses is given in the public parts of the application for authorisation ("public versions" of the assessment reports, i.e. the Chemical Safety Report, Analysis of alternatives, Socio-economic analysis, Substitution plan or their annexes). In such a case ECHA has reserved the right under Article 64(2) of REACH to supplement the broad information package for the public consultation on alternatives with the necessary information from the "complete versions" of these assessment reports with the aim to make the public consultation meaningful. ECHA gives the applicant the opportunity to comment its proposal for broad information of uses before the final version is issued and published.

See also Q&A 590, 592 and 594.
How is the time-limited review period set in authorisation decisions?

ECHA has consulted the services of the European Commission on this. As a general principle, if you apply for authorisation before the latest application date, the review period would be counted from the sunset date. In practice, this means that applying early would not shorten your time for placing on the market and/or using the substance after the sunset date as compared to applying closer to the latest application date.

If you apply for authorisation after the latest application date, the placing on the market and use of the substance will no longer be allowed as from the sunset date, unless a decision granting an authorisation has been adopted by then. If the decision is adopted before the sunset date, the review period would in principle be counted from the sunset date. If a decision is adopted after the sunset date, the review period would be counted from the date of entry into force of the decision

Article 2(5), subparagraphs (a) and (b), and Article 56 subparagraphs (4)((a), (b), and (c)) and (5)((a) and (b)) of REACH exempt from the authorisation requirement a number of uses in products (medicinal products, food or feedingstuffs, plant protection products, biocidal products, motor fuels, cosmetic products and food contact materials, respectively) within the scope of, or covered by, the sector-specific Union legislation specified in those provisions. 1. Do these exemptions cover the incorporation of the Annex XIV substance into the product during the manufacturing process? 2. Do these exemptions also cover the life-cycle steps (such as formulation) preceding the incorporation of the substance into the product in question?
  1. Yes, these exemptions cover the incorporation of a substance into the product during the manufacturing process.
  2. Yes, the uses of a substance upstream preceding an exempted end-use are also exempted but only in the volumes ending up in the exempted end-use.  It should be noted that, with regard to uses in cosmetic products and in food contact materials, the exemption only applies when the intrinsic properties specified in Annex XIV for the substance in question concern hazards to human health.
 
Article 56 (4)(d) of REACH contains an exemption from the authorisation requirement for the use as fuels in closed systems. Does this exemption also cover the life-cycle steps (such as formulation) preceding this end-use?

Yes, the uses of a substance upstream, preceding "use as fuels in closed systems", are also exempted under the condition that the control of the risks – i.e., use in closed systems – is also pursued in the upstream life-cycle steps preceding the end-use as a fuel.

Does an application for authorisation for the use of a substance in a medical device regulated by the sector-specific legislation referred to in Article 60(2) 2nd subparagraph of REACH have to be submitted for a substance for which Annex XIV specifies human health hazards only? Does this exemption cover the incorporation of the Annex XIV substance into the product during the manufacturing process? If so, are the life-cycle steps preceding the incorporation of the substance in the medical device subject to authorisation?

Pursuant to Articles 60(2) and 62(6) of REACH, an application for authorisation is not required for a substance used in a medical device regulated under Directives 90/385/EEC, 93/42/EEC or 98/79/EC if that substance has been identified in Annex XIV for human health concerns only.   Nor is an application required in such cases for the incorporation of the substance into the medical device during the manufacturing process or for the uses and corresponding volumes of that substance upstream preceding the end-use.

Article 56 (3) of REACH exempts from the authorisation requirement the use of a substance in scientific research and development (SRD). Does this exemption also cover the life-cycle steps (such as formulation) preceding the end-use in SRD?
Yes, the uses of a substance upstream preceding an exempted end-use in SRD are also exempted in quantities of the substance ending up in SRD (i.e. under 1 t/y per user) subject to what is set out below.
 
Article 3(23) defines SRD as any scientific experimentation, analysis or chemical research to be carried out "under controlled conditions" and "in a volume less than one tonne per year". Therefore, the exemption in Article 56 (3) covers an activity which is delimited by a certain level of control of risks– i.e., use under controlled conditions and in a volume less than 1 tonne per year. It also applies to the upstream life-cycle stages of the substance preceding its end-use in SRD, for the volumes ending up in that end-use and which, during the upstream life-cycle, are handled and/or used under controlled conditions, even if the volume handled and/or used during the upstream life-cycle stages exceeds 1 tonne per year.

In case of any contradictions between the position expressed in this Q&A and the positions expressed previously by ECHA in the RCOM of 20 December 2011, the position expressed in this Q&A should be considered as the current understanding of the law. It takes precedence over any other views communicated previously by ECHA on this issue.
 
Is the manufacture of a substance, whether for export or placing on the EU market, subject to the authorisation requirement?

The manufacture of a substance is not subject to the authorisation requirement. After a substance has been manufactured it may have to be handled before it is exported or placed on the EU market. Operations which are necessary for the handling of a substance on its own in the manufacturing for export or placing on the EU market are considered to be part of the manufacturing stage (e.g. filling into appropriate containers, storage, addition of stabiliser, dilution to a safer concentration -if necessary for transport safety-), but not other uses such as the formulation of a mixture or incorporation of the substance into articles. The formulation of a mixture or incorporation of the substance into articles are considered "uses" within the meaning of Title VII of REACH and are subject to the authorisation requirement whether or not the mixture or articles will be exported or placed on the EU market. 

I am a downstream user and the European Commission has not yet decided on the application for authorisation of my supplier of the substance. The sunset date is approaching or is even passed. What should I do?

You can continue using the substance also after the sunset of the substance, provided that a company up your supply chain has applied for authorisation for your use before the latest application date for this substance.

If the Commission has made the decision of granting an authorisation you must notify the use to ECHA three months from the first delivery of the substance. Note that you can notify ECHA about your use only after the Commission's decision. Your notification needs to refer to the specific authorisation number indicated in the label of the product and the safety data sheet you receive from your supplier, which corresponds to your use. Authorisation numbers have the format 'REACH/xx/x/x'. See also https://echa.europa.eu/support/dossier-submission-tools/reach-it/downstream-user-authorised-use and https://newsletter.echa.europa.eu/home/-/newsletter/entry/4_15_downstream-users-notify-echa-if-you-use-an-authorised-substance

Applications for Authorisation - b) Format and content of authorisation application dossiers

What is the format for authorisation applications?

Application for authorisation dossiers shall consist in an IUCLID file, to which a series of specific documents are attached. For the purpose of an application for authorisation, the latest version of IUCLID should be used. Formats for these attachments are provided by ECHA on its website

How can an applicant submit an application to ECHA?

Authorisation application dossiers shall be submitted electronically via REACH-IT. See (http://echa.europa.eu/applying-for-authorisation)

In which language shall I submit my application for authorisation to ECHA?

The whole application can be submitted in any single official EU language. For example, you can submit the whole application in English. However, you cannot submit an application where most of the documents are in English and rest in another language, For details, see question 129.

What will ECHA do if it receives applications that contain documents in more than one official EU language?

ECHA would consider those parts of the Application that are not in the main language as "not received". These documents could be essential for conformity of the application under Article 62 of REACH. If so, the Committees would request the applicant to submit an update of these documents in the main language. If the applicant fails to submit the translations, the Committees would not consider the application to be in conformity with the requirements of Article 62.

What is meant by the "Broad Information on Uses" package and what does it contain?

The Broad Information on Uses (BIU) of the Annex XIV substance refers to a "brief wording" containing:

- information based on the name of the use applied for,
- the use descriptors and function, and
- key information on the conditions of use.

In addition, the BIU contains the following documents:

- the public version of the Analysis of alternatives,
- the public version of the Substitution Plan, if provided in the application,
- the public version of the Socio Economic Analysis, if provided in the application, and
- the public version of sections 9 ("Exposure assessment") and 10 ("Risk characterisation") of the Chemical Safety Report (CSR) covering the use applied for.

For further details and example, see: http://echa.europa.eu/documents/10162/13555/public_information_afa_en.pdf

Will the applicant's name be made public?

Yes. The applicant's name will normally be made public as part of the Broad information Use during the public consultation on alternatives.

How can I provide in my application a "complete" and a "public" version of sections 9 ("Exposure assessment") and 10 ("Risk characterisation") of the Chemical Safety Report (CSR) covering the uses applied for?

Include the complete versions of sections 9 and 10 in your Chemical Safety Report (CSR) and attach the CSR to section 13 of IUCLID (naming it for instance "CSR.pdf").

Attach a public version of sections 9 and 10 naming it clearly (e.g. "Public_version_of_CSR sec9-10.pdf") and attach it as a separate document in section 13 of IUCLID.

If all the information contained in sections 9 and 10 can be made public, then these two sections will be published as they are provided in the CSR.

Do I need to update my Chemical Safety Report (CSR)?

If you (as the applicant) have already registered the Annex XIV substance, the CSR prepared for registration purposes should be the basis for the preparation of the CSR needed in an application for authorisation. However, it is likely that it needs to be updated and adapted to the authorisation context (e.g. regarding the refinement of uses, emissions and exposures, the overall quality of the CSR, etc). When submitting your application you can attach a version of your CSR specifically developed for authorisation. You can use this opportunity in cases, where you may wish to provide – for the authorisation purposes –  only an extract of the latest updated CSR submitted in the registration process. This updated CSR would contain only those parts that are relevant for the authorisation application, but developed in more detail.

Or you can simply refer to the CSR provided in your registration dossier. In the latter case you should – if necessary – update your CSR before you submit your application to ECHA. If you develop a specific CSR for authorisation, you should be aware that as a rule the information contained in the CSR submitted in an authorisation application should be in the CSR provided in the registration dossier.

After the sunset date the applicant will need to update the CSR submitted in the registration in order to remove all uses for which he has not applied for authorisation.

Following the authorisation decision taken by the Commission, the Applicant may also need to further update the CSR submitted in his registration.

How can an applicant provide information in its application which should not be made publicly available?

Applicants can provide information which should not be made public in the "complete versions" of the assessment reports (Chemical Safety Report, Analysis of Alternatives, Substitution Plan, Socio-Economic Analysis). Formats and instructions are available under the "Preparing Applications for authorisation" page (http://echa.europa.eu/applying-for-authorisation/preparing-applications-for-authorisation).

Applicants need to make "public versions" of these "complete versions". In "public versions"  the applicants need to blank out confidential business information. The "public versions" will be published on ECHA's website during public consultation on alternatives. Applicants need to provide solid justifications as to why the information which has been blanked out should not be made public.

What is a joint application?

A joint application is an application made and submitted simultaneously by a group of applicants (i.e. the submitting applicant and the co-applicants). The submitting applicant shall generate the list of co-applicants participating in the application and indicate the applicant-substance-use combinations. The co-applicants then need to confirm their participation to ECHA before the submitting applicant uploads the application.

Is a joint application easier to submit and manage than separate applications?

Due to the possible complexity and technical issues of joint applications, ECHA recommends to prepare and submit a joint application when (i) all co-applicants of the group apply for all uses in the joint application, and (ii) the co-applicants have agreed on a way to share all the information provided in the application.

In complex cases, it may be preferable for each applicant to submit their own application separately. The applicants can cooperate during the preparation of their applications. For details, see the manual ‘How to prepare an application for authorisation manual’.https://echa.europa.eu/manuals, Application for Authorisation Guidance (Appendix 2) and the presentations "Description of uses for authorisation / Broad Information on Uses" and "Joint versus Individual applications" for additional information.

Can an additional legal entity join a group of applicants after the submission of a joint application?

No. In contrast with Joint Registrations, an additional legal entity cannot join the group of applicants which have already submitted a joint application for authorisation.

What is a subsequent application?

An applicant may submit a subsequent application in which he can refer to appropriate parts of an application previously submitted for a use of a substance, provided that the subsequent applicant has permission from the previous applicant(s) to refer to these parts. Furthermore, the subsequent applicant shall update the information taken over from the original application as necessary. This subsequent application will be processed and evaluated on its own merits.

How will ECHA communicate with the applicant once an application has been submitted?

Via REACH-IT and the secured webforms. However, for organisational and practical issues, emails can be used.

I consider that the substance that I will apply for has a threshold. What if RAC disagrees with my assessment?
RAC intends to develop "reference DNELs" and "reference dose response relationships" for substances that have been listed in Annex XIV. The intention is to make these available before the latest application date has expired (see Q&A 752).
 
If you disagree with RAC's view you can justify this in your application. RAC will evaluate this during the opinion making process.
 
If RAC has not made the "reference DNELs" or ""reference dose response relationships" available before the latest application date it will do so during the opinion making. In any case, you and RAC will need to clarify the possible scientific issues relating to the thresholdness of the substance during the opinion making process.
 
If a threshold cannot be demonstrated, it is not possible to apply based on Article 60(2) in relation to adequate control. However, the application can be evaluated based on Article 60(4). In this case ECHA strongly recommends that the application contains a socio-economic analysis(see Q&A 617).
In a joint application, can confidential information from a joint applicant made secret to the other applicants?
No. The submitting applicant (i.e. the applicant submitting the joint application on behalf of the group of joint applicants) has access to all the information contained in the application. Furthermore, during opinion making confidential information is likely to be referred to within the group of joint applicants; for instance, in ECHA's messages in REACH-IT all co-applicants receive a copy of the message. 
 
ECHA will treat a joint application as a whole and has no possibility to make any special arrangements to accommodate confidentiality issues between joint applicants. 
 
See also Q&A 596.
Can I submit a single application covering several substances?

Yes, if they form a group. The possibility to cover more than one substance in the same application is limited to substances that meet the definition of a group of substances as stated in Section 1(5) of Annex XI of the REACH Regulation. In all other cases, you have to submit a separate application for each substance. See Appendix I of the Guidance on the preparation of an application for authorisation on substance grouping.

The manual requires us to attach a concordance table to our application. Is there a template?

To further simplify the preparation of applications for authorisation, ECHA no longer requires concordance tables. Any reference to the concordance table in the manuals can therefore be ignored.

When commenting the draft opinions of RAC and SEAC, can I submit additional or new data that I had not provided when the committees were preparing them?

When reading the Committees' draft opinions you may have noticed misinterpretations, misunderstandings or even errors that need to be addressed in the draft opinions. ECHA encourages you to provide all the necessary clarifications with the relevant supporting evidence during the commenting period. However, the Committees will only take into account new data or information (e.g. new measurements, figures) that are related to such misinterpretations, misunderstandings or errors noted by the applicant. It is the obligation of the applicant to provide the necessary relevant data at the time of the initial submission of the application or in response to earlier requests from the Committees.

Does the exemption for the use of Annex XIV substances in scientific research and development under Article 56(3) of REACH also apply to sampling activities for further quality control analysis?

No. When a sample containing an Annex XIV substance is taken from a production line for further analysis the sampling activity shall be described and assessed e.g. in a worker contributing scenario that is part of the application for authorisation. However, activities considered to form part of the use of the sample in performing analytical activities can benefit from the exemption under Article 56(3) of REACH. See also Q&A 585.

Applications for Authorisation - c) Authorisation fees and invoicing

How to calculate the fee for an application for an authorisation?

Several scenarios can be envisaged: A base fee is payable, which covers one applicant and one use. For each additional applicant, an additional fee per applicant applies. In addition, an additional fee applies for each additional use. For example, in the case of an application submitted by four parties with ten uses in total, the relevant fee will be the base fee + three additional applicant fees + nine additional use fees. The level of the base fee and the additional fee per use depends on the size of the companies that are part to the application. It is important to note that, if you are an SME that is party to an application with other parties that are not SMEs, the standard levels of fees set out in Table 1 of Annex VI of the Fees and Charges Regulation will apply. Likewise, the reduced fees for micro companies set out in Table 4 only apply when all parties to the application are micro companies.

However, the level of the additional fee per applicant depends on the applicant's size, regardless of the size of the other parties to the application. For instance, if you are a micro company and you apply for an authorisation with large corporations, the reduced fee per additional applicant that applies to micro companies is still applicable to you.

Further information: ECHA Fee Calculator: a tool provided by ECHA to estimate the possible amount of a fee related to a given application for authorisation.

On the REACH Fee regulation: see more information on REACH Legislation -page

Application for one applicant and one substance only

If you submit an application for an authorisation on your own, you will have to pay a base fee. That fee covers one use and one substance. If you need to apply for authorisation for more uses, you will need to add an additional fee for each additional use you want to cover. Thus, if your application covers three uses, the fee that you will have to pay is the sum of the basic fee + two additional use fees. The level of the base fee and the additional fees depend on the size of your company; reduced fees apply if you are a micro, small, or medium-sized enterprise.

Application for one applicant and more than one substance

It is important to note that the possibility to cover more than one substance in the same application is limited to substances that meet the definition of a group of substances as defined in Section 1(5) of Annex XI of the REACH Regulation. In all other cases, a separate application must be submitted for each substance.

If you submit an application for an authorisation on your own, you will have to pay a base fee, which covers an application for one substance and one use. For each additional substance that is covered by your application, you will have to pay an additional fee per substance. Likewise, for each additional use you want to cover, you will have to pay the additional fee per use. For example, if your application covers two substances - one having two uses and the other having three uses - you will have to pay a base fee + one additional substance fee +  four additional use fees. The level of the base fee, the additional fees per substance, and additional fees per use depend on the size of your company; reduced fees apply if you are a micro, small or medium-sized enterprise.

Application covering more than one applicant and more than one substance

It is important to note that the possibility to cover more than one substance in the same application is limited to substances that meet the definition of a group of substances as defined in Section 1(5) of Annex XI of the REACH Regulation. In all other cases, a separate application must be submitted for each substance.

A base fee is payable, which covers one applicant, one substance, and one use. For each additional applicant, an additional fee per applicant applies. In addition, an additional fee per substance applies for each additional substance and additional fee per use applies for each additional use. For example, in the case of an application submitted by four parties covering three substances and fifteen uses in total, the relevant fee will be the base fee + three additional applicant fees + two additional substance fees + fourteen additional use fees. The level of the base fee and the additional fees per substance and per use depends on the size of the companies that are party to the application. It is important to note that, if you are an SME that is party to an application with other parties that are not SMEs, the standard levels of fees set out in Table 1 of Annex VI of the Fees and Charges Regulation will apply to you. Likewise, the reduced fees for micro companies set out in Table 4 of Annex VI of the Fees and Charges Regulation only apply when all parties to the application are micro companies.

The level of the additional fee per applicant depends on the applicant's size, regardless of the size of the other parties to the application. For instance, if you are a micro company and you apply for an authorisation with large corporations, the reduced fee per additional applicant that applies to micro companies is still applicable to you.

Application covering more than one applicant and only one substance

A base fee is payable, which covers one applicant and one use. For each additional applicant, an additional fee per applicant applies. In addition, an additional fee applies for each additional use. For example, in the case of an application submitted by four parties with ten uses in total, the relevant fee will be the base fee + three additional applicant fees + nine additional use fees. The level of the base fee and the additional fee per use depends on the size of the companies that are part to the application. It is important to note that, if you are an SME that is party to an application with other parties that are not SMEs, the standard levels of fees set out in Table 1 of Annex VI of the Fees and Charges Regulation will apply. Likewise, the reduced fees for micro companies set out in Table 4 only apply when all parties to the application are micro companies.

However, the level of the additional fee per applicant depends on the applicant's size, regardless of the size of the other parties to the application. For instance, if you are a micro company and you apply for an authorisation with large corporations, the reduced fee per additional applicant that applies to micro companies is still applicable to you.

How will ECHA calculate the fee and send the invoice in the case of joint applications?

ECHA will calculate the fee based on the Fee Regulation. It has made available a Fee Calculator to help the applicants to know in advance the amount that they would expect to pay.

ECHA will send the invoice always to the legal person that submitted the application. Thus, in a joint application ECHA will send the invoice to that applicant that submitted the application. It is then up to this applicant to split the invoice according to the agreement that the applicants have made between themselves. For clarity, ECHA is not in a position to send separate invoices to each of the parties covered by the application. 

How will the applications be invoiced and paid?

ECHA sends the applicant an invoice in about 8 weeks after the submission.  

The applicant has 14 calendar days to pay the invoice with a possibility to extend it by another 7 calendar days. Thus, all in all the applicant is given 21 days to pay the invoice from the date it received the invoice.

If the payment is not made by the extended payment due date, the application for authorisation will be considered as not received by ECHA. In this case the application is not processed further. The only way to proceed is to re-submit the application.

The Fee Regulation (EC No 340/2008) related to the fees for Applications for authorisation has been amended by Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) No 254/2013 of 20 March 2013. Updated articles 8(2) and 9(2) state that "the Agency shall issue one invoice covering the base fee and any applicable additional fees". How will these additional fees be levied?

The necessity to impose an additional fee will reflect ECHA's workload associated with processing and evaluating the application. The calculation of the base fee and any applicable additional fees is described in Q&As ID=600 to 605. An example where an application might lead to additional workload is the situation where the number of ‘uses applied for' and/or exposure scenarios is greater than one. As far as one "use applied for" shall be covered by at least one exposure scenario, the number of uses vs the number of exposure scenarios might not be identical. Thus, in order to reflect the additional workload, ECHA calculates the fee based on the highest number of uses vs exposure scenarios.

Example 1: if you apply for two uses that are covered together in your Chemical Safety Report by one generic exposure scenario, ECHA will calculate the invoice based on two uses.

Example 2: If you apply for two uses which are covered by three different exposure scenarios, ECHA will estimate whether the evaluation of the additional exposure scenario increases ECHA's workload and whether the fee can be based on three uses.

Is there a fee for confidentiality claims in Applications for authorisation?

No.

Will ECHA consider one exposure scenario for article service life as equivalent to one use for determining the fee?

No. Currently ECHA will not impose a fee for an exposure scenario covering an article service life. ECHA needs to gain experience with the first applications for authorisations. ECHA reserves its right to re-evaluate this approach if, based on the experience gained with handling this type of exposure scenarios in the context of an Applications for Authorisation, ECHA concludes that the associated workload warrants a fee. It is also possible that a fee may be imposed for instance, in conjunction with a review of the Fee Regulation in the future.

Applications for Authorisation - d) Preparing for authorisation application

What is the purpose of the pre-submission information sessions?

Pre-submission information sessions give an opportunity for future applicants to clarify regulatory and procedural aspects of the authorisation application process, and for ECHA to have a better understanding of the practical issues related to Applications for authorisation.
For further details see ECHA's Support webpage on pre-submission information sessions (link to: http://echa.europa.eu/applying-for-authorisation/pre-submission-information-sessions).

When and how can I request a pre-submission information sessions?

You can make a request a pre-submission information session either when notifying ECHA of your intention to submit an application for authorisation, or later. You should nevertheless send your request for a pre-submission information session at least 8 months before the planned date for the submission of your application for authorisation. Although you can still notify less than 8 months in advance of the submission of your application, this may have an impact on ECHA's availability to organise a pre-submission information session for your company. Please bear in mind the PSIS should take place at least 2 months after the meeting request and that you probably would like to have sufficient time after the PSIS to potentially further work on your application before submitting it to ECHA.

Requests for pre-submission information sessions are made via a secure web form, available on ECHA's website. For further details see ECHA's Support webpage on pre-submission information sessions (link to: http://echa.europa.eu/applying-for-authorisation/pre-submission-information-sessions).

How can I have access to the Lead Registrant's Chemical Safety Report (CSR) data if he is not taking part in the application for authorisation? What can I do if the data owner refuses to give me access to its data? Can I use the information available on ECHA's dissemination website?

A CSR has to be submitted as part of the application. This CSR can be (i) the applicant's own CSR for authorisation, or (ii) a reference to CSR submitted by the same applicant for registration, or (iii) a reference to CSR of a previous applicant (case of subsequent applications for authorisation). If the applicant for authorisation is a Downstream User (i.e. not a registrant) and he generates his own CSR for the authorisation, this CSR can be based on updated information from the registrant's CSR as long as he has the right to use the information from the respective data owners.

However, data sharing obligations as specified under Art 30 of REACH do not apply for authorisation. The reproduction or further distribution of information from Registration Dossiers and Notifications to the C&L Inventory which are published on ECHA's dissemination website may be subject to copyright protection. Furthermore, the use of the information without obtaining the permission from the owner(s) of the respective information might violate the rights of the owner. The Agency does not take responsibility for any copyright or other infringements that may be caused by using the information.

Potential applicants are reminded that they shall ensure that they have adequate rights to submit this information to the Agency and acknowledge that this information can be used for the purpose of the application for authorisation.

See also question 916

Will a pre-submission information session (PSIS) be available for the whole group of applicants participating in a joint application or will there be a separate PSIS for each co-applicant?

In joint applications, only one PSIS will be available, and this session is for the group of applicants as a whole. Due to the limited availability of places for the PSIS, it is for the group of applicants to decide who would be the most appropriate to represent them in the session.

How should I develop the ‘uses applied for' and exposure scenarios in my application?

The description of the ‘uses applied for' and of the related exposure scenarios is key step in the preparation of an application for authorisation. The concept of "use applied for" in the context of applications for authorisation might significantly differ from what industrial actors usually understand by a "use" in their day-to-day practice. The ‘use applied for' description, scope and level of details are not only related to the risks linked to the exposure/release of the Annex XIV substance but also to the analysis of alternatives and, where relevant, to the socio-economic analysis and substitution plan. The following documents describe this issue in more details:

 
Which DNEL should I use?

The demonstration of adequate control or minimisation of the risks should be made in the Chemical Safety Report (CSR) of the application for authorisation. REACH Annex I defines the Derived No-Effect Level (DNEL), i.e. the level of exposure above which humans should not be exposed and the way the risk characterisation for the human population should be performed, based on the DNEL (if a DNEL can be determined). DNELs derived according to the ECHA guidance are therefore the reference data for the demonstration of adequate control. 

It should be noted that the Committee for Risk Assessment (RAC) has derived reference DNELs for  some substances on Annex XIV and intends to continue doing so for other Annex XIV substances. 

For more details, see:

How many pages should an application contain?

An application for authorisation is not a matter of pages but rather how convincing the argumentation is. All the necessary information for the ECHA Committees for making their opinions and for the Commission to make its decision should be included in the application in a clear and convincing way. Overall in a well-argued application, strong or clear messages should not be diluted or obscured by lengthy text. Also you can consider using appendixes to provide additional, complementary information.

Would the application be in conformity according to Article 62(4)(d) of REACH if it took as a premise the ‘Reference DNEL' or ‘dose response relationship' adopted by RAC and published on ECHA's website?

Yes, as long as the application is in conformity with the rest of Article 62 and the applicant decides to use in his assessment the DNELs or dose response relationships derived by RAC for the intrinsic properties of the substance specified in Annex XIV. In this case the applicant does not need to provide the hazard data necessary to derive DNELs or dose response relationships.

See also Q&A 752 and 912

Do I need to include Part A in the Chemical Safety Report (CSR), when I submit it as part of my application for authorisation?

Yes, the Chemical Safety Report shall always include the "Part A" duly completed. Part A contains the Summary of Risk Management Measures and the declarations that these measures are implemented and communicated. See also Q&A 611.

Applications for Authorisation - e) Analysis of alternatives and socio-economic analysis

Do I need to consider also Substances of Very High Concern (SVHC) in my Analysis of Alternatives?

Usually not. A suitable alternative should results in an overall reduction of risks to human health and the environment compared to the Annex XIV substance. An alternative substance having a similar (eco)toxicological profile to the Annex XIV substance (for instance a SVHC substance) is unlikely to meet the overall reduction of risks criterion. However, even if the alternative does not lead to an overall reduction of risk, this alternative substance should still be part of your analysis of alternatives but the conclusion regarding the overall reduction of risks should be relatively straightforward. As a consequence, you may consider whether a detailed analysis of its technical and economic feasibility is necessary in such a case.

How will the ECHA Committees (RAC and SEAC) take into account third parties' comments submitted during the public consultation on alternatives?

As a result of the eight-week public consultation both the "complete" and the "public" versions of the comments on the alternatives are made available to the Rapporteurs and the Committee members. The Rapporteurs will use this information as any other information during an evaluation process. The relevance, validity and reliability of the information will be assessed. The applicant will have a possibility to respond to the "public versions" of the comments. The Rapporteurs may pose follow-up questions to the third parties. They may also pose questions or require additional information from the applicant, as a result of the information provided by third parties.

What is the scope of the Analysis of Alternatives and the Socio-economic Analysis? The applicant's perspective or the society as a whole?

Both the applicant's and society's perspectives are relevant in the application. The applicant's perspective is relevant in the Analysis of Alternatives to assess how feasible it would be for the applicant to adopt any alternatives which are available to him. This would include the alternative of ceasing use of the substance altogether. This analysis can be used to identify the non-use scenario(s) which would pertain, if authorisation is not granted. The use and non-use scenarios should be assessed from society's perspective to provide an assessment of whether authorisation is justified from a social perspective or not, based on a comparison of the benefits of authorisation and the risks.

The applicant should undertake an Analysis of Alternatives as if they will be unable to use the substance in question beyond the sunset date, that is, as if their application for authorisation is not granted. Thus, the scope should be whatever the applicant would normally use when choosing alternative substances or technologies in his business. One qualification to this is that alternatives might be suggested through the public consultation of which the applicant was previously unaware or would not normally consider. He might wish, therefore, to extend the normal scope of his analysis in anticipation of this.

It is not possible to generalise about the exact scope of the socio-economic analysis, as this will vary on a case-by-case basis. The principle is that all factors should be incorporated to the extent that they might make a material difference to the conclusions. An iterative approach to developing the analysis, as well as consultation and input from socio-economic analysis experts, can be helpful in establishing the appropriate scope in any given situation.

More details in the presentations of the seminars on application for authorisation:

http://echa.europa.eu/addressing-chemicals-of-concern/authorisation/applications-for-authorisation/afa

I will submit an Analysis of Alternatives for a threshold substance. I have R&D activities to develop and implement safer alternatives that are neither suitable nor available yet. Can I submit a Substitution Plan with my application?

A Substitution Plan should be provided if suitable alternatives are available (cfr. Article 62(4f)). A Substitution Plan is a commitment to take the actions needed to substitute the Annex XIV substance with a suitable alternative substance or technology within a specified timetable. If you conclude that the alternatives you have identified are neither suitable nor available yet, you should not submit a separate Substitution Plan. You should rather include all the relevant information on R&D activities in your Analysis of Alternatives. Refer to the Guidance on Application for Authorisation for more information.

Is it appropriate to provide a socio-economic analysis under the adequate control route?

There is no requirement to submit a socio-economic analysis when submitting an application for authorisation under the adequate control route. However, ECHA recommends that a targeted socio-economic analysis is also prepared under the adequate control route. This would be helpful in particular to the Committees when proposing to the Commission the duration of the review period. Furthermore, if the ECHA Committees do not support the applicant's assessment according to which the risks are adequately controlled, the application can still be evaluated on the provided socio-economic analysis.

How should the "economic feasibility" criteria be interpreted?

Based on Articles 60(4) and 64(4)(b) of the REACH Regulation the Committee for Socio-economic Analysis (SEAC) needs to state in its opinion, if the alternatives to the substance that is applied for are suitable. Economic feasibility is one aspect of this. It is recognised that the evaluation of economic feasibility is intrinsically linked with the evaluation of the other aspect of suitability of the alternatives, i.e. technical feasibility. Usually the more difficult (or easy) it is to substitute a substance the more expensive (or cheap) it is to do this. The note below describes how SEAC intends to evaluate economic feasibility as part of applications for authorisation recognising the link with technical feasibility.

What is the level of details needed for the analysis of alternatives?

The applicant should undertake an Analysis of Alternatives as if they will be unable to use the substance in question beyond the sunset date, that is, as if their application for authorisation is not granted. Thus, the level of detail should be whatever the applicant would normally use when choosing alternative substances or technologies in his business. However, as stated in the guidance on applications for authorisation: "It is strongly recommended that the applicant demonstrates that a comprehensive and adequate assessment of alternatives has been done. This is because the Agency in its opinions and the Commission in its assessment of whether suitable alternatives are available will take "all relevant aspects" into account {Art. 60(5)}, including information submitted by interested third parties." However, regarding the assessment of the risks arising from the use of the alternative and the comparison of these risks with the ones arising from the use of the Annex XIV substance "the applicant is not required to generate new hazard data or provide a chemical safety assessment for each of the alternatives. Nor is it required that the risks associated with alternative substances or technologies are assessed in the same detail as the risks associated with the Annex XIV substance."

In conclusion, the level of effort that needs to be put into the analysis of alternatives will be a matter of judgment for the applicant and should reach a point where the applicant is comfortable in defending its analysis in front of the ECHA Committees.
 

Should I consider in my socio-economic analysis the aspects outside the EU?

Yes, if they are relevant. However, the focus of the socio-economic analysis should be the EU but information on effects outside the EU may be relevant as well. See chapter 2.4.3 in the "Guidance on the preparation of socio-economic analysis as part of an application for authorisation"[PDF] for more information. 

Applications for Authorisation - f) Technical instructions for specific Annex XIV entries

The entry for Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) indicates 2 EC entries and 5 CAS entries. How should the substance identification sections (1.1 and 1.2) in an IUCLID application for authorisation dossier be filled in?

The Annex XIV entry for HBCDD is a relatively broad entry, which might be considered to describe UVCB substances (with undefined Br positions), as well as multi-constituent substances (containing more than one defined diastereoisomers at concentrations between ≥10% and <80%), and mono-constituent substances (one diastereoisomer ≥80%).

If the application concerns one particular HBCDD substance (either UVCB, or multi- or mono-constituent), then sections 1.1 and 1.2 should describe this specific substance, following the general instructions provided in the Manual: How to prepare an application for authorisation (link to: https://echa.europa.eu/manuals).

Should the application concern more than one substances covered by the HBCDD entry (for instance due to different manufacture processes by one manufacturer, or in case of a joint application with applicants manufacturing/importing significantly different HBCDD substances), the application can still be considered as an application for "one Annex XIV substance". Therefore ECHA will charge a fee for "one substance", and the IUCLID dossier shall accordingly contain one substance dataset.

In this latter case, for technical reasons in section 1.1 of the IUCLID application dossier the following information should be filled in: IUPAC name: Hexabromocyclododecane; Type of substance – Composition: other: multiple substances under Annex XIV entry. The actual compositions of the substances applying for can be listed individually as different compositions in section 1.2 by using the repeatable block-function. In the "Brief description" field of each listed composition, please indicate also a remark, e.g. "substance manufactured from manufacturing site A" or "substance manufactured/imported by applicant B".

It is reminded that the REACH Annex XIV substance entry number (for HBCDD this number is "3") shall always be given in section 1.3 of the IUCLID dossier.

General instructions on how to prepare an IUCLID application for authorisation dossier are provided in the Manual: How to prepare an application for authorisation (link to: https://echa.europa.eu/manuals)

Can an application for authorisation for chromium trioxide cover the use of the chromic acids and their oligomers generated from adding chromium trioxide to water?

Yes. The reasoning and some example are provided below.

When brought in contact with water, chromium trioxide (EC number 215-607-8) forms two acids and several oligomers: Chromic acid (EC number 231-801-5), Dichromic acid (EC number 236-881-5), Oligomers of chromic acid and dichromic acid (further referred as "Chromic acids and their oligomers"). These chemical species are all identified as substances of very high concern (SVHC) and included in Annex XIV1 as two separate entries. Latest Application Date (21 March 2016) and Sunset Date (21 September 2017) are identical for both entries.

Chromic acids and their oligomers generated in water from chromium trioxide are commonly referred to as an aqueous solution of chromium trioxide. With regard to the authorisation requirements, it may be justifiable in some situations to consider for practical reasons chromic acids and their oligomers as an aqueous solution of chromium trioxide.

The generation of chromic acids and their oligomers by adding chromium trioxide to water is a use of a substance under REACH. This may be a discreet use of chromium oxide by a formulator or part of an integrated process in the use of chromium oxide. Considering this in the context of applications for authorisation, this operation should be considered as a "use applied for" and be addressed in the chemical safety report (CSR), the analysis of alternatives and, if appropriate, in the socio-economic analysis. Hence, applications for authorisation that are meant to cover further uses down the supply chain after the initial step in which chromium trioxide is brought in contact with water, have to refer to the chromic acids and their oligomers.

This answer is strictly limited to chromium trioxide and chromic acids and their oligomers generated from chromium trioxide in water. The system in aqueous solution is a complex equilibrium between multiple chemical species which depends on several physico-chemical parameters and the different chemical species cannot be isolated from the aqueous solution. The answer should thus not be applied by analogy to any other substance.

The table below describes possible scenarios in the case of an application for authorisation is made by the manufacturer/importer/user of chromium trioxide and/or chromic acids and their oligomers. Technical instructions are provided in the last column of the table.

As a general rule, sections 1.1, 1.2 and 1.3 of IUCLID should always refer to the substance applied for (i.e. the substance indicated in the third column - "Application for authorisation" of Table 1). In addition, if there is more than one substance which is imported/used (scenario #2 below) or if the substance actually imported/used is different from the substance applied for (scenario #3b below) this information should be described in section 1.2.

For each use, the assessment performed in the assessment reports (CSR, analysis of alternatives (AoA) and socio-economic analysis (SEA)) should relate to the substance relevant for that use. The substance at the use level (e.g. chromic acids and their oligomers - used in electroplating) might indeed differ from the substance applied for (e.g. chromium trioxide) in terms of hazard, physical form / potential for exposure to Cr(VI), alternatives, etc.

Table 1 - Possible scenarios in the case of an application made by the manufacturer/importer of chromium trioxide and/or chromic acids and their oligomers2

 

Scenario # Actor / Scenario Application for authorisation Explanation / Technical instructions
1 Manufacturer / importer/User of chromium trioxide who generates chromic acids and their oligomers in water applies for an authorisation for this use and the further uses of chromic acids and their oligomers (by itself and/or its downstream users) One application for authorisation for chromium trioxide covering the further uses of the chromic acids and their oligomers Substance ID in IUCLID
  • Section 1.1:indicate chromium trioxide as reference substance
  • Section 1.2: describe the actual composition of chromium trioxide
  • Section 1.3: indicate the A.XIV entry 16 (entry number for chromium trioxide)
Assessment reports in IUCLID (CSR, AoA, SEA):
  • Assessment to be based on the relevant substance per use (chromium trioxide or chromic acids and their oligomers). The two substances may differ e.g. in terms of hazard, form / potential for exposure to Cr(VI), alternatives etc.
2

Importer/User of both
- chromium trioxide
and
- chromic acids and their oligomers generated in water from chromium trioxide

applies for an authorisation for the generation in water  of chromic acids and their oligomers and their further uses (by itself  and/or its downstream users)
 

One application for authorisation for chromium trioxide covering the further uses of the chromic acids and their oligomers

The application should be made for chromium trioxide making clear that chromic acids and their oligomers are also imported/used.

Substance ID in IUCLID:

  • Section 1.1: indicate chromium trioxide as reference substance
  • Section 1.2: describe as first composition the actual composition of chromium trioxide and as second composition the actual composition of chromic acids and their oligomers. In addition, indicate in the "brief description" field that both chromium trioxide and chromic acids and their oligomers are imported/used.
  • Section 1.3: indicate the A.XIV entry 16 (entry number for chromium trioxide)

Assessment reports in IUCLID (CSR, AoA, SEA):

  • Assessment to be based on the relevant substance per use (chromium trioxide or chromic acids and their oligomers). The two substances may differ e.g. in terms of hazard, form / potential for exposure to Cr(VI), alternatives etc.
3 Importer/User of chromic acids and their oligomers generated in water from chromium trioxide applies for an authorisation for the further uses of chromic acids and their oligomers (by itself and/or its downstream users) One application for authorisation either for
  1. chromic acids and their oligomers generated from chromium trioxide covering the further uses
  2. or for
  3. chromium trioxide covering the further uses of chromic acids and their oligomers

In case the importer/user decides to apply for an authorisation for chromic acids and their oligomers in an application for chromium trioxide (case b), it has to become clear from the application that what is actually imported/used are chromic acids and their oligomers:

Substance ID in IUCLID:

  • Section 1.1: indicate as reference substance the substance applied for: either chromic acids and their oligomers (case a) or chromium trioxide (case b)
  • Section 1.2:
    • in case a): describe the actual composition of chromic acids and their oligomers
    • in case b): for technical reasons describe as first composition the composition of chromium trioxide (100% purity) and as second composition the actual composition of chromic acids and their oligomers. In addition, indicate in the "brief description" field that what is actually imported/used are chromic acids and their oligomers.
  • Section 1.3 indicate the A.XIV entry of the substance applied for: 17 if applying for the chromic acids and their oligomers (case a) or 16 if applying for chromium trioxide (case b)

Assessment reports in IUCLID (CSR, AoA, SEA):

  • Assessment to be based on chromic acids in terms of e.g. in terms of hazard, form / potential for exposure to Cr(VI), alternatives etc.

 

4 Manufacturer/Importer/User of chromic acids and their oligomers generated by alternative methods other than from adding chromium trioxide to water3
or
Importer/User who is unaware of the manufacturing methods of the chromic acids and their oligomers applies for an authorisation for the further uses of chromic acids and their oligomers (by itself and/or its downstream users)
One application for authorisation for chromic acids and their oligomers covering the further uses

The approaches described above cannot be applied as the starting material for manufacturing chromic acids and their oligomers is not chromium trioxide or is not known.

Substance ID in IUCLID:

  • Sections 1.1: indicate as reference substance: chromic acids and their oligomers
  • Section 1.2: describe the actual composition of chromic acids and their oligomers
  • Section 1.3: indicate the A.XIV entry 17 (entry number for chromic acids and their oligomers)

Assessment reports in IUCLID (CSR, AoA, SEA):

  • Assessment to be based on chromic acids and their oligomers, in terms of e.g. hazard, form / potential for exposure to Cr(VI), alternatives etc.

 

Please see also Q&A=804 (Do chromic acids and their oligomers, generated in water from chromium trioxide, require their own registration under REACH?)

1  Entry#17: 'Acids generated from chromium trioxide and their oligomers. Group containing: chromic acid, dichromic acid, and oligomers of chromic acid and dichromic acid' And Entry#16: 'chromium trioxide'

2  Chromic acids and their oligomers generated from chromium trioxide could be described in IUCLID sections 1.1 and 1.2 e.g. as a UVCB substance with IUPAC name "Acids generated from chromium trioxide and their oligomers" and Brief description "complex composition typically including oligomers of chromic and dichromic acids in equilibrium with each other". As constituents there could be listed i) chromic acid, ii) dichromic acid, and iii) oligomers of chromic and dichromic acids.

3  Further clarification may be needed as to whether alternative methods would lead to similar equilibrium as for aqueous solutions

Applications for Authorisation - g) Changes of legal entity

What is a change of legal entity that needs to be notified for applications for authorisation or granted authorisations?

A change of legal entity is a change of the legal person who is the applicant of an authorisation or an authorisation holder. This change can take place, for instance, as the result of a merger, a split or an asset sale (sale of a production site or business). Also purely administrative changes such as a change of corporate name or address and a change of Only Representative (OR) of a non-EU company need to be notified.

Certain forms of legal entity change which need to be notified in the authorisation process do not need to be notified in other REACH processes, such as registration (see also Q&A 1242).

Can an application for authorisation or a granted authorisation be transferred?

Yes. An application for authorisation or a granted authorisation can be transferred as long as the transfer is the result of the change of legal entity referred to in Q&A 1239 and the person to whom it is transferred qualifies as manufacturer, importer or downstream user with regard to the substance(s) and the use(s) covered by the application for authorisation or the decision. For details, see Q&As 1239 and 1242. On Only Representatives, see Q&A 1250.

Please note that a change of legal entity cannot extend the scope of the original application for authorisation or of the authorisation, e.g. to cover different uses.

How can I notify a change of legal entity regarding an application or an authorisation?

Please follow the next steps:

  • If relevant, create a new REACH-IT account for the successor legal entity. This is relevant when the legal entity change entails a change in the legal personality of the applicant or authorisation holder and the new legal entity did not have a REACH-IT account before.
  • Notify ECHA via this web form (under "Type of communication” select "Notification of a change of legal entity") including two attachments:
    • Evidence of change, for instance the merger agreement or the agreement of the sale of assets.
    • Filled announcement using the following format1 . This describes the change of legal entity and the concerned application(s) or authorisation(s), as well as provides an analysis of the key impacts. It needs to be signed by both the original and the successor legal entity.

Remember, that if the original entity has other REACH assets (e.g. registrations), the change of legal entity may need to be notified, too. See ECHA’s Practical Guide and technical instructions provided in the REACH-IT tool.

Do I have to pay a fee when notifying my change of legal entity?

Currently no fee needs to be paid for this notification for the purposes of authorisation.

 

What will happen after I notified ECHA of my change of legal entity regarding an application?
In case of a notification after the submission of the application, but before the issue of the decision by the European Commission, ECHA will acknowledge the receipt of your notification and will assess:
  • Whether the notified change has been properly documented.
  • Whether it induces modifications in the submitted information and any implications for the RAC and SEAC opinions.
ECHA will also update the respective databases and web site as necessary.
What will happen after I notified ECHA of my change of legal entity regarding a granted authorisation?
In case of a notification after the authorisation was granted, firstly ECHA will acknowledge its receipt and confirm the nature of the notified change, as mentioned in Q&A 1244. Then ECHA will assess if the legal entity change should trigger a review of the authorisation based on Art 61(2) REACH and send its assessment to the European Commission, who will decide as appropriate.
The application was submitted before the Latest Application Date. If the legal entity changes, do the transitional arrangements set out in Article 56(1)(d) of REACH continue to apply to the legal successor?
Yes, provided that the change does not imply an extension of the scope of the original application (see Q&A 1241).
What action and by when is expected from ECHA and the European Commission following a notification of a change of legal entity regarding an application / authorisation decision?

Where the change concerns a pending application for authorisation, ECHA endeavours to communicate whether the notified change is properly documented and its view on whether the change is minor (i.e. purely administrative changes and changes that would not have material implications on the content of the application or the terms of the RAC and SEAC opinions) or major (i.e. all other cases) in two weeks. If the change is confirmed to be properly documented, it will be considered to be valid as of the date of the notification.

In that case ECHA will amend its database as regards the concerned legal entity. If the change is major, the RAC and the SEAC might need additional time to assess the implications of the change during the opinion-making process.

In cases concerning granted authorisations, ECHA will send its assessment on the nature of the change to the European Commission, including its assessment on whether a review of the authorisation should be triggered on the basis of Article 61(2) of REACH.

The timelines for the assessment about any implications for the RAC and SEAC opinions or for the authorisation decision (potential trigger of a review of the authorisation) depend on the stage in the process at which the notification was made.

When do I need to inform ECHA about the change of legal entity?
You need to notify this as soon as it has taken place, i.e. when you have documentary evidence that you can send to ECHA. However, in order to reduce uncertainty about its impact, you can also consult ECHA on the specific case in advance, provided you have sufficient information about the foreseen change. For any questions regarding legal entity changes related to authorisation please contact ECHA at legal-entity-changes-authorisation@echa.europa.eu.
I am preparing an application for authorisation while knowing that a change of legal entity will take place in the near future. How should I address this in the application?
As you foresee a change of legal entity, to the extent feasible we recommend to also describe this in the application and analyse the potential consequences of this change in your assessment. This would facilitate the assessment of the application by ECHA / the Commission once such change has occurred. You are advised to use the same format as in Q&A 1242 for reporting your analysis of the key impacts on the information in the application.
Does a change of an Only Representative (OR) need to be notified to ECHA and how?

Yes.
Please proceed as follows:

  • Create a new REACH-IT account for the new Only Representative. 
  • Then notify ECHA via this web form i) under "Type of communication” please select "Notification of a change of legal entity", ii) mention the affected submission number and uses applied for (of application) or the authorisation number(s) (of granted authorisation), iii) indicate the Company UUID of the new REACH-IT account, and iv) include evidence of the appointment as the Only Representative.

ECHA will verify the evidence of the change and inform you as soon as it has updated its databases. In case of a granted authorisation, ECHA will also forward your notification to the European Commission.

Does a change of corporate name of an applicant or an authorisation holder need to be notified to ECHA and how?

Yes.

Please submit the notification as follows:

  • Go to REACH-IT and use the “change name” functionality to update the name. Please provide in REACH-IT an extract from commercial register as evidence of the change.
  • Then notify ECHA via this web form. Under "Type of communication” please select "Notification of a change of legal entity", mention the affected submission number (of application) or authorisation number (of granted authorisation), and confirm that you have updated the name in REACH-IT.

In this manner ECHA can quickly process the change. ECHA will verify the evidence of the change and inform you as soon as it has updated its databases. In case of a granted authorisation, ECHA will also forward your notification to the European Commission.

Applications for Authorisation - h) Review reports

What is difference between a Review Report and the Application for Authorisation?

The Review Report updates the Application for Authorisation (AfA), and it must be sent to ECHA. The fee is the same as the one for an AfA. The Review Report will follow the same process as for an AfA. The greater the relevant technical and other progress during the review period, the greater the need to update the information. The information elements are the same. In other words, a Review Report should include an updated version of the assessment reports submitted in the original application (Chemical Safety Report, Analysis of Alternatives and – when relevant – an updated Socio-economic Analysis and an updated Substitution Plan). The use description may also need to be updated e.g. to reflect a more narrow scope. 

See Section 6 of the Practical Guide “How to apply for an authorisation” at https://echa.europa.eu/documents/10162/13637/apply_for_authorisation_en.pdf/bd1c2842-4c90-7a1a-3e48-f5eaf3954676
All the Q&As related to Applications for Authorisation are also valid for Review Reports mutatis mutandis.

I have submitted my Review Report on time i.e. at least 18 months before the end of the review period. The Commission has not issued its decision before the end of the review period. Can I continue to use the substance according to the authorisation decision until the Commission issues its decision?
Yes, until a decision on the review (maintaining, amending or withdrawing the authorisation) is adopted - see also Q&A 0571; 0572; 0573 which relate to the submission windows and the (latest) submission dates. The Q&As are also applicable to Review Reports.
I have submitted my Review Report too late i.e. less than 18 months before the end of the review period. The Commission has not issued its decision before the end of the review period. Can I continue to use the substance according to the authorisation until the Commission issues its decision?
No, the substance cannot be used after the end of the review period. You will have to wait the Commission’s decision before you can continue using the substance.
Can I submit a Review Report for a use that has not been authorised?
No. To submit a Review Report, the use has to be the one for which you have an authorisation. But you can submit a new Application for Authorisation.
Can I narrow down the scope of the authorised use in a review report to be more specific?
Yes. As long as your use is within the scope of the authorised use, but more narrowly defined, you can prepare a Review Report for the review of the authorisation. No need to make a new application in this situation. 
In the Review Report, can I split my use which was originally authorised into two or more specific, more narrowly defined different uses?
Yes you can, as long as each of the new redefined uses are within the scope of the previously authorised use. Please explain this clearly in the explanatory note to be submitted with the review report. In this case an updated version of the Chemical Safety Report, Analysis of Alternatives and – when relevant – a Socio-economic Analysis and a Substitution Plan must be submitted for each use. Splitting the use will have an effect on the fee (i.e., an additional charge will be imposed for the second use). At the same time in some cases this may make your Review Report clearer and more focussed, which helps ECHA’s scientific committees’ evaluation and the Commission’s decision making.
Will ECHA’s Scientific Committees use the information gathered from the downstream user notifications (based on REACH Article 66) during the evaluation?
Yes.
Will ECHA’s Scientific Committees use information from enforcement authorities?
Yes. Authorisation holders should use this information too, when preparing the Review Report.
Will I be able to submit another Review Report after this one as a result of a new Commission’s decision?
Yes.
I was unable to demonstrate adequate control of risks for a threshold substance in the original application that I submitted originally. Will I need to do so in the Review Report?
No, you do not have to. However, it would be advisable to do so. Moreover, you shall ensure and demonstrate in the review report that the exposure is reduced to as low level as is technically and practically possible. 
How will I submit the Review Report?
You can submit it to ECHA in the same manner as the original application, using the formats available for that purpose on the ECHA’s website. However, you will naturally need to indicate that it is a Review Report and make a link to the original application. You will also need to write an explanatory note which briefly explains what is different in the review report compared to the original application. For details see the Guide “How to apply for authorisation”: https://echa.europa.eu/documents/10162/13637/apply_for_authorisation_en.pdf/bd1c2842-4c90-7a1a-3e48-f5eaf3954676
Are any substances already subject to authorisation?

Yes. The List of Substances Subject to Authorisation (Annex XIV of the REACH Regulation) includes several substances.

Substances are regularly added to Annex XIV by the European Commission, on the basis of recommendations issued by ECHA. The link to the updated Annex XIV can be found on ECHA's website at: http://echa.europa.eu/addressing-chemicals-of-concern/authorisation/recommendation-for-inclusion-in-the-authorisation-list/authorisation-list.

Further details on the procedure for the inclusion of substances to Annex XIV of the REACH Regulation are available in FAQ ID=127, as well as on ECHA's website at: http://echa.europa.eu/regulations/reach/authorisation.

Where do I find the candidate list?

The Candidate List of Substances of Very High Concern (SVHC) for authorisation (Candidate List) is available on ECHA's website at: http://echa.europa.eu/candidate-list-table.

Additional substances are regularly included in the Candidate List, once these have been identified as SVHC.

How is a substance included in the Candidate List?
When the European Commission or a Member State considers that a substance may meet the criteria for identification as SVHC pursuant to Article 57 of REACH, ECHA (on request of the European Commission) or the Member State prepares an Annex XV SVHC dossier. With this Annex XV dossier ECHA or the Member State proposes the inclusion of the substance in the Candidate List by outlining the scientific evidence for identifying the substance as a SVHC.
 
ECHA's website includes a public registry of intentions in order to allow interested parties to be aware of the substances for which the authorities intend to submit Annex XV dossiers and thus facilitates timely preparation of the interested parties for commenting later in the process.
 
Once an Annex XV SVHC dossier has been prepared, a consultation of the Member States and interested parties is required, as specified in Article 59 of REACH. Further details on this consultation process are available on the ECHA website at http://echa.europa.eu/proposals-to-identify-substances-of-very-high-concern.
 
Following this consultation, the substance may be included in the Candidate List. The Candidate List is made available on ECHA's website in its last updated version at http://echa.europa.eu/candidate-list-table.
How is a substance from the Candidate List included in the "Authorisation List"?

Substances included in the Candidate List may be prioritised for inclusion in Annex XIV of the REACH Regulation (the so called "Authorisation List"). The Authorisation List contains all substances which, after a certain deadline, may only be used and/or placed on the market after a specific authorisation has been granted.

ECHA has to make at least every second year a recommendation of priority substances for inclusion in Annex XIV to the European Commission. Interested parties are invited to submit comments during this process. In addition, the Member State Committee issues an opinion on the recommendation before it is submitted to the European Commission. The European Commission then decides using the comitology procedure which of the recommended substances are to be included in Annex XIV and specifies, based on ECHA's recommendation, the transitional arrangements and, where relevant, exemptions and review periods. Further details on the procedure for inclusion of substances in Annex XIV of the REACH Regulation are available on ECHA's website at http://echa.europa.eu/addressing-chemicals-of-concern/authorisation/recommendation-for-inclusion-in-the-authorisation-list .

How are authorisations granted for substances on the "Authorisation List"?

Applications for authorisation need to be made within the deadline (the so called "latest application date") that is specified in the "Authorisation List" for the corresponding substance if the applicant wishes to use the substance without interruption after the sunset date. Authorisation applications need to be submitted to ECHA. Third parties can provide information on alternative substances and technologies during public consultations on the uses that authorisation has been applied for. These are made available on ECHA's web-site. The ECHA Committees for Risk Assessment (RAC) and Socioeconomic Analysis (SEAC) give draft opinions on the application. Applicants will have the opportunity to comment on these draft opinions. RAC and SEAC will adopt final opinions and ECHA sends them to the European Commission. The European Commission decides, using the comitology procedure, whether an authorisation is granted or refused. ECHA will establish a publicly available database that will contain summaries of the Commission decisions. Further details on the application for authorisation procedure are available on ECHA's website under the following links:http://echa.europa.eu/regulations/reach/authorisation http://echa.europa.eu/addressing-chemicals-of-concern/authorisation/applications-for-authorisation

In which language do Applications for authorisation have to be submitted to ECHA?

Applications for authorisation may be submitted in any one of the official EU languages selected by the applicant. This means that the whole application, including the attachments and the Chemical Safety Report, must be submitted in the same language. This is a legal requirement based on Article 104(1) of REACH and Article 2 of Regulation No 1 of 15 April 1958.

Does the use of a substance listed on Annex XIV require an authorisation when contained in a mixture at a concentration below that specified in Article 56(6) (a) and (b) of REACH?

Authorisation is required for the use of a substance included in Annex XIV of REACH, either on its own or in a mixture. If a substance is used as such, this is a use of the substance on its own, and the exemptions in Article 56(6) (a) and (b) of REACH cannot be applied. If the substance is used in a mixture, then the aforementioned exemptions may be applied. These exemptions apply to SVHCs meeting the criteria of points (d), (e) and (f) of Article 57 of REACH below a concentration limit of 0.1 % w/w, and for all other substances below the values specified in Article 11(3) of Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 which result in the classification of the mixture as hazardous.

Does the authorisation requirement apply to a substance listed in Annex XIV of REACH which is used exclusively as an analytical reagent or in routine analysis?

If the substance is used for monitoring or quality control purposes under controlled conditions in quantities below 1 tonne per year, it falls under Article 56(3) of REACH, which exempts substances used in scientific research and development from the authorisation requirement.

Categories Display