Registration Dossier

Diss Factsheets

Administrative data

Hazard for aquatic organisms

Freshwater

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC aqua (freshwater)
PNEC value:
0.245 µg/L
Assessment factor:
1 000
Extrapolation method:
assessment factor

Marine water

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC aqua (marine water)
PNEC value:
0.025 µg/L
Assessment factor:
10 000
Extrapolation method:
assessment factor

STP

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC STP
PNEC value:
60 mg/L
Assessment factor:
100
Extrapolation method:
assessment factor

Sediment (freshwater)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC sediment (freshwater)
PNEC value:
960 mg/kg sediment dw
Assessment factor:
10
Extrapolation method:
equilibrium partitioning method

Sediment (marine water)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC sediment (marine water)
PNEC value:
96 mg/kg sediment dw
Assessment factor:
10
Extrapolation method:
equilibrium partitioning method

Hazard for air

Air

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for terrestrial organisms

Soil

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for predators

Secondary poisoning

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no potential for bioaccumulation

Additional information

Conclusion on classification

Aquatic toxicity classification of inorganic metals and metal compounds is conducted by comparing transformation/dissolution (T/D) data for the substance, generated using the standard protocol (UN GHS, Annex 10) with toxicity data for the most soluble metal substance as described in the CLP technical guidance (section IV. 5 Application of classification criteria to metals and metal compounds) (EU, 2008). The T/D data is ideally tested at the pH at which the highest dissolution is expected, within the range defined by the test protocol (pH 5.5-8.5). Since inorganic tungsten substances have been demonstrated to have a higher T/D rate at pH 8.5 than pH 6, the data used for aquatic toxicity classification of tungsten disulphide was derived at pH 8.5 (24-hour, 7-, and 28-day T/D testing) (CANMET-MMSL, 2017). These T/D values were compared to the corresponding acute (31000 μg W/L, based on the ErC50) aquatic toxicity reference values derived from sodium tungstate testing of algae, as the most sensitive standard aquatic species for sodium tungstate. The results of this comparison demonstrate that tungsten disulphide does not classify for acute aquatic toxicity.