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Environmental fate & pathways

Biodegradation in soil

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
biodegradation in soil
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Further evidence of biodegradation. % degradation and half-lives not reported.

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Degradation of vinyl acetate by soil, sewage, sludge and the newly isolated aerobic bacterium V2
Author:
Neider, M., Sunarko, B. and Meyer, O.
Year:
1990
Bibliographic source:
Applied and Environmental microbiology, Vol. 56, No.10, p.3023-3028

Materials and methods

Principles of method if other than guideline:
Non-standard
GLP compliance:
no
Test type:
laboratory

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Details on test material:
Obtained from Fluka
Specific details on test material used for the study:
Details on properties of test surrogate or analogue material (migrated information):
No data reported
Radiolabelling:
no

Study design

Oxygen conditions:
aerobic/anaerobic
Soil classification:
not specified
Soil properties
Soil type:
other: loamy soil from a cornfield
Details on soil characteristics:
pH6
Initial test substance concentration
Initial conc.:
20 other: mM

Results and discussion

Details on results:
All samples of soil, sludge and sewage actively degraded vinyl acetate under the conditions employed. Degradation was observed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and led to the stoichiometric amounts of acetate and acetaldehyde.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Executive summary:

The study by Neider et al. (1990) shows that vinyl acetate is subject to microbial degradation in the environment. The microflora inhabiting soil, sludge and sewage are capable of hydrolysing vinyl acetate without lag. In addition, microbial isolates from sludge and soil were found to be capable of utilizing VAM as a sole carbon source.